Common eye problems

School Years

A school-age child’s eyes are constantly in use in the classroom and at play. For school-aged children, several different visual skills must work together so they can see and understand clearly.

Once in school, it is recommended your child have an annual comprehensive eye exam, as vision can change quickly.

A school-age child’s eyes are constantly in use in the classroom and at play.  For school-aged children, several different visual skills must work together so they can see and understand clearly.

As 80% of a child’s learning is based on vision, and one-in-four school age children has a vision problem, it is important they have a regular comprehensive eye exam.  Approximately 60% of children experiencing reading difficulties have an undiagnosed or untreated vision problem.

Undetected and untreated vision problems can elicit some of the same signs and symptoms that are commonly attributed to other development issues, such as ADHD, dyslexia and speech problems.

Your child may not realize they have a vision problem as they may simply assume everyone sees the way they do.  And, it’s not uncommon for parents to believe they would know if their child has a vision problem, because these issues can be hard to spot particularly if there is a problem in only one of the eyes.

Signs and Symptoms Your Child May Have a Visual Problem

Be alert for signs and symptoms that could indicate your child has a visual problem, including:

  • red, itchy or watering eyes
  • sensitivity to light
  • an eye that turns in or out
  • squinting, rubbing the eyes, or excessive blinking
  • a lack of concentration
  • covering or closing one eye
  • holding objects very close to the face
  • avoiding books and television
  • visible frustration or grimacing
  • titling the head or unusual posture

If you notice any of these symptoms, book an comprehensive eye exam appointment with your doctor of optometry.